two . VAMPIRISM

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Estimated Creation Year: Year: 1,500 AD

God or Prophet of Vampirism: The Beast, the superior vampire.

Main books of Vampirism: See the work of Jane Vajkard Valvasor, Anne Rice and Bram Stoker.

Main exponents of Vampirism: Dion Fortune, Marie Laveau, Mother Shipton.

Headquarters / Capital in the world: Transilvania.

Number of faithful around the world: Unknown.

Main symbol of vampirism:

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Basic principles of vampirism.

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Vampirism

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A vampire is, according to the folklore of several countries, a creature that feeds on the vital essence of other living beings in order to stay active. In some Aboriginal Eastern and American cultures, this superstition is a demonic deity or minor god who is part of the sinister pantheon in their mythologies. The vampire figure is a universal legend collected on all continents and in many cultures around the world. Theories about the vampire exist since time immemorial, although the term did not become popular until the 16th century, by the hand of the writer Jane Vajkard Valvasor, in his book on the vampire Jure Grando, The Honor of the Duchy of Craim, an attempt to understand the wild side of man, his dark side, and his most repressed instincts and impulses. But, perhaps, the most curious thing is that it is a complex myth that can be unraveled, and in fact, it is seen from many points of view: the mythological, the literary, the zoo, the psychological, related to diseases, the emotional , the energetic, because, somehow, we all resonate with the legend far beyond myth, and because of what, today, psychology describes as mental illness characterized by sexual arousal associated with a compulsive need to seeing, feeling or ingesting the blood, whether or not there is the self-deception of being a vampire. On the other hand, the figure of the romantic vampire that emerged almost more than 200 years ago, such as William Polidori's The Vampire or Bram Stoker's Dracula, are just some of the iconic characters that embody it, and yet there are many other stories about it. of "real vampires", as ensures a recent investigation of the University of Hertfordshire in which they are counted.

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For vampirism, blood is the source of life, vital energy, the engine, and the path to eternal life. This is the motto in fiction, but what about reality? Is it really bad to drink so much blood? It is safe? Science explains in a recent study published in Medicalxpress that we are flesh and blood. And inside our blood vessels, blood carries almost everything the body needs. It picks up oxygen from the lungs and nutrients from the intestine and the hand delivers them to the cells. But could we feed only on blood? No, because we would die. However, many of the blood disorders that have led to diseases that for centuries have resembled vampirism: plague epidemics, schizophrenia, rabies, blood disorders , and even 'vampires' themselves have used it. as a medicine, as an iron-rich supplement to combat blood conditions such as anemia. For them, blood consumption is a quality of life problem and it is necessary to maintain their energy.

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The vampire and mental illness

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While some vampires drink blood to feel better physically, researchers suggest that the desire to drink blood could stem from mental illness. Schizophrenia and dissociative identity disorder have been linked to clinical vampirism, an obsession with drinking blood that is sometimes referred to as Renfield syndrome, a term coined by psychologist Richard Noll in his 1992 book, Vampires, Werewolves and Demons: Twentieth Century Reports in the psychiatric literature. In Bram Stoker's Dracula novel, RM Renfield is an animal-eating prisoner in a madhouse, who believes that blood is the source of life.

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Contemporary stories of vampires, which drip blood and sexuality in equal parts, something that psychoanalysts have taken advantage of to propose the Freudian theory to explain their appeal, as reflected in Psycology Today : “The myth can be understood along several levels of psychosexual development: in oedipal terms, for example, the vampire is seen as a kidnapper of women, killing and enslaving any man who crosses his path. The meaning and universal persistence of the myth suggest deep roots in the evolution of our psyche. It suggests the ever-present desire to conquer the secret of life while containing the elements of its renewal. It represents the terrible desire for survival, destroying others to maintain its own existence. Vampirism, as a mortal sin, is contained in the image that most often comes to mind, the perverse nature of the vampiric act, in which the biting and sucking of blood produces an orgasmic sensation that exceeds intercourse.

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Even the director of the American series True Blood, Allan Ball, in an article by Rolling Stone , summarizes Freudian theories as "For me, vampires are sex."

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Today, there are numerous Vampire Associations. The Vampire Association of New Orleans , Voices of the Vampire Community .

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The real Count Dracula was Vlad III, known as Vlad "The Impaler" (Vlad Tepes in Romanian), he was a sadistic character in history who lived about 540 years ago, in Transylvania. He died on December 14, 1476. This ruthless prince of Wallachia, southern Romania, became famous for making torture his hobby , earning the nickname "The Impaler" for his fondness of nailing his enemies to stakes .

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Reference:

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https://the-line-up.com/6-famous-witches

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