5. THE CHINESE GENOCIDE OF THE 21ST CENTURY

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September 03, 2020.


At a press conference last week Chinese officials were asked about continuing reports that China has locked up more than a million Uyghur, Kazakh and other Muslims in Xinjiang province in concentration camps. A liar regional government spokesman responded that it was "utter nonsense" and that the facilities - which China has called vocational education schools - prevent extremism and are "of a different nature" than those in the United States, Britain or France. When asked about reports of large-scale forced labor imposed on the Uighur minority, another genocidal Xinjiang official said it was "utter nonsense made out of thin air." But then, if it is "absolute nonsense," how to explain the barbed wire, watchtowers and concrete that have been erected around Xinjiang, in the westernmost part of China? If it's silly, why do so many eyewitnesses describe an archipelago of prisons and camps meant to exterminate Uighur culture, language, and traditions?

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China Concentration Camp and Genocidal Practices. 2020.

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BuzzFeed News published further evidence of this grotesque project on August 27, 2020, in an investigation that identified dozens of specially constructed high-security camps and detention facilities. Eyewitness accounts, government documents and satellite images released by academics and journalists have shown that, since late 2016, China is forcing Uyghurs into a system of incarceration, systematic cultural annihilation and genocide by contraceptive methods. The BuzzFeed probe signals a new wave of determination and permanence. China's determination to end the Uighur culture is hardening.

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It is for all this that Chinese authoritarianism spearheads the largest mass internment and genocide of an ethnic-religious minority group since World War II. The concentration camps are the most extreme example of China's inhumane policies against the Uighurs, but the entire population is subject to repressive policies. China has used mass surveillance to turn Xinjiang into a high-tech police state. Uighurs inside and outside the camps are exploited for cheap labor, forced to make clothes and other products for sale both at home and abroad. The New York Times revealed in July 2020 that some Chinese-made face masks sold in the United States and other countries were produced in factories that relied on Uighur labor. Another recent investigation found evidence that Chinese authorities subjected Uighur women to mass sterilizations, forcing them to take contraceptives or abort and placing them in camps if they resist. Some have argued that this attempt to control the Uighur population meets the United Nations definition of genocide . However, the authoritarian Chinese government is lying by claiming that the camps are vocational and training centers, and that they are teaching people job skills. He has justified the oppression in Xinjiang as an attempt to suppress terrorism and extremism emanating from the Uighur separatist movement. There have been incidents of violent unrest for years, including some deadly terrorist attacks, and at least one Uighur extremist group in the region, the East Turkestan Islamic Movement, has ties to al-Qaeda and the global jihadist movement. But most experts say that Beijing's repression and subjugation of millions of Uighurs is disproportionate to the comparatively minor terrorist threat in the region. As more and more reports of the atrocities taking place in Xinjiang are revealed, the international community is grappling with how to punish China for its abuses.

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The United States imposed sanctions on Chinese officials involved in the persecution of Uighurs and punished companies believed to be dependent on Uighur forced labor. Advocates and bipartisan groups of lawmakers are calling for stronger action, and earlier this week the House of Representatives passed bipartisan legislation that requires companies to prove that products from the Xinjiang region are not made with Uighur labor. forced. However, the persecution of the Uyghurs continues and in full view of the world in the 21st century.

References:

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/11/16/world/asia/china-xinjiang-documents.html

https://www.cfr.org/backgrounder/chinas-repression-uighurs-xinjiang

https://www.hrw.org/report/2018/09/09/eradicating-ideological-viruses/chinas-campaign-repression-against-xinjiangs

https://jcpa.org/article/chinese-approach-radical-islam/

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/sep/24/china-has-built-380-internment-camps-in-xinjiang-study-finds

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-54277430

https://www.abc.es/ciencia/abci-sexo-y-muertes-violentas-terrible-historia-grabada-huesos-cruzados-201904190207_noticia.html?ref=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com% 2F

https://www.lavanguardia.com/historiayvida/edad-media/20190604/47311453498/los-cruzados-vistos-por-los-musulmanes.html

https://hasbarapp.org/articulos/5785-2/

https://www.vox.com/2020/7/28/21333345/uighurs-china-internment-camps-forced-labor-xinjiang

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/24/world/asia/china-muslims-xinjiang-detention.html

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/global-opinions/new-evidence-of-chinas-concentration-camps-shows-its-hardening-resolve-to-wipe-out-the-uighurs/2020/09/ 03 / aeeb71b4-ebb2-11ea-99a1-71343d03bc29_story.html

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