6. SHAMANISM

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Estimated year of creation: 11,000 BC

God of Shamanism: Nature / Mother Earth / Pachamama.

Main deities of Shamanism: God and Nature.

Headquarters / Capital in the world: Each country has different cities where Shamanism is practiced, especially in Latin America, Siberia, China and Japan.

Number of faithful around the world: Unknown.

Main books of contemporary Shamanism:

 

  • The four paths of the shaman.

  • The wisdom of the shamans.

  • The teachings of Don Juan.

Main symbol of Shamanism: Even though there is no specific symbol for Shamanism, we share this graphic that represents the shaman ideology, since it is the eye that sees everything, on earth and in the sky.

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Main representatives of Mexican Shamanism:   Don Lucio de Morelos, Doña María Sabina in Huautla, Doña Asunción in Hidalgo, Doña Licha de Puebla and Pachita, in Mexico City.

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Basic principles of Shamanism:

At a general level, Shamanism is based on the idea that the visible world, also called the natural world, is dominated by a series of spirits or forces that we cannot see but that affect and trigger effects on the lives of human beings in this area. flat. In this sense, unlike other religions that are deeply associated with animism and are led by members of a society, the tradition of shamanism uses particular knowledge and skills that allow it to find the answers it seeks.

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Although, although there are many variants of shamanism around the world, there are a series of elements that they share and in which they coincide from their first practitioners and their first expansions, among which are fundamentally the following:

  • The shaman is able to establish communication with the spirit world.

  • There are spirits and they play a fundamental role in human life and in human societies.

  • The shaman can conjure up images of animals that serve as omen guides or guides.

  • In shamanism, spirits can be both good and bad.

  • The shaman can remove his spirit from his body in order to enter the supernatural world.

  • The use of techniques to induce the shaman trance is generated to incite visionary ecstasy.

There are many variants of shamanism in the world; The following are beliefs shared by all forms of shamanism: it must be clarified that shamanism comes from the "shaman", who is typical of the eastern region of Siberia, although, as Mircea Eliade points out, in his attempt to make a general history of the shamanism, there is a great diversity of shamans scattered throughout the world, and they are characterized by the fact of being doctors and / or spiritual guides who make ascents to heaven. For shamans, spirits exist and play an important role both in individual lives and in human society.

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  • The shaman can communicate with the spirit world.

  • Spirits can be good or bad.

  • The shaman can treat illnesses caused by evil spirits.

  • The shaman may employ trance-inducing techniques to incite visionary ecstasy.
    The spirit of the shaman can leave the body to enter the supernatural world to seek answers.

  • The shaman conjures up images of animals as spirit guides, omens, and message bearers.


Shamanism is based on the premise that the visible world is dominated by invisible forces or spirits that affect the lives of the living. Unlike organized religions such as animism or animatism, which are led by parish priests and practiced by all members of a society, shamanism requires individualized knowledge and special abilities. Shamans act outside of established religions, and traditionally act alone. Shamans can come together in associations, as Indian tantric practitioners have done.

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Reference: http://www.diosuniversal.com/Leyendas/Chamanismo

Short description of Shamanism.

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Shamanism refers to a class of traditional beliefs and practices similar to animism that ensure the ability to diagnose and cure human suffering and, in some societies, the ability to cause it. Shamans believe they achieve this by contacting the spirit world and forming a special relationship with them. They claim to have the ability to control time, prophesy, interpret dreams, use astral projection, and travel to the upper and lower worlds. Shamanism traditions have existed throughout the world since prehistoric times.

Some specialists in anthropology define the shaman as an intermediary between the natural and spiritual world, who travels between the worlds in a state of trance. Once in the spirit world, he communicates with them for help in healing, hunting, or time control. Michael Ripinsky Naxon describes shamans as people who have strong ancestry in their surrounding environment and in the society of which they are a part.

The origin of the word "shaman":

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The word "shaman" originates from "šamán", most likely from the Tungus language of Mongolia. The word was brought to the West in the 17th century by the Dutch traveler Nicolaas Witsen, who recounted his experiences with the Tungus-speaking people of Siberia in a book, Noord en Oost Tartaryen, which was published in several languages. The root of the word means "to know". However, Mircea Eliade, who has written extensively on shamanism and shamanic experience, points to the Sanskrit word śramaṇa, which refers to a wandering monastic or holy figure. That word has spread to many Central Asian languages ​​along with Buddhism and could be the ultimate origin of the word Tungusic. This particular etymology indicates an ancient interface between the shamanic and Buddhist wisdom systems, and it is of great interest to our endeavor to bring these two traditions together in the modern context. Ronald Hutton's general definition of the word shaman in his book, Shamans: Siberian Shamanism and the Western Imagination, is helpful. The word shaman refers to "anyone who comes into contact with a spiritual world while in an altered state of consciousness, particularly on behalf of others." What the shaman "knows" is the nature of the spirit world: the spirits of nature, the spirits of human beings, and the spirits of other forms of beings that, according to shamanic understanding, influence the affairs of human beings. The shaman uses this knowledge to heal, guide, divine, mediate, and educate the community in which he lives. Shamans are the doctors, priests, psychopomps, and teachers of their communities. They perform these tasks with the help of the spirits with whom they make contact, altering their state of consciousness through dreams, the use of repetitive sounds, or the ingestion of psychotropic plants. Spirits generally take the form of nature, so the shaman may have spirit guides in the form of a hawk, bear, or plant. Through repeated encounters with these guides, the shaman comes to understand the particular abilities and capacities of the spirits. Incursions into the spirit world provide them with the information they need to perform the particular tasks required of them.

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Shamanism takes many forms depending on the cultural environment in which it is found. According to Mircea Eliade in his book, Archaic Techniques of Ecstasy, the following statements can be made about the practice of shamanism in most cultural contexts where it is found:

1. Spirits exist in different forms, particularly those of nature, and affect the lives of human beings.

2. The shaman can communicate with the spiritual world and enter it to seek answers to problems or cure diseases.

3. Dreams are an important access point to the spirit world, and the information and guidance that comes in dreams that the shaman has is important and can be revealing.

There are many other aspects of shamanic practice that are important to a full understanding of shamanism. However, it is these particular aspects of shamanism that interest us for the purposes of this essay, as we will build on them later as we bring together the practices of shamanism and Buddhism. Shamanism has been practiced for millennia and has many powerful and important aspects. His proximity to the natural world and his effort to harness the power of the Earth is critical to helping shamans maintain a strong relationship with the wisdom of nature. The loss of this connection is, according to the shamans with whom I have spoken, the reason for the current crisis that we are experiencing. The effort to try to discern the wisdom that is held in the processes of the natural world is an important step in the evolution of consciousness. As such, according to Robert Lawlor's extensive treatise on Australian Aboriginal shamanism, Voices of the First Day: Awakening in the Aboriginal Dreamtime, shamanism is the earliest form of spiritual research and contributes to theological research of later spiritual traditions. This spirit of inquiry into the worlds of the invisible is a very important contribution that shamanism makes to the expansion of consciousness. One form this research takes is through the shamanic journey, one of the primary tools that Deep Hypnosis weaves together with Vipassana meditation techniques to reestablish an accessible path to spiritual coherence.

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Deep Hypnosis and the Altered State: Where Buddhism and Shamanism Meet.

Both shamanism and Buddhism seek to probe the mysteries of life through their own particular forms of inquiry. In shamanic practice, shamanic "travel" provides a method of inquiry that focuses primarily on establishing relationships with normally invisible forms of guidance contained in the natural world. These forms of guidance are often called "helping spirits." These helper spirits assist the shaman in healing, divination, and problem solving. In Buddhist practice, meditation, study, and reflection within the context of the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path is the primary vehicle for self-development. If both forms of research work so well within their individual contexts to achieve the goal of those who practice within each model, the question is: why bring them together? Part of the answer lies in the particular requirements of contemporary people struggling with dislocation due to loss of connection to the natural world and its processes. Another part lies in the disorientation that many modern people experience due to the betrayal of integrity by modern orthodox spiritual leaders. This experience, combined with the paucity of tools that Western forms of healing offer to heal the spirit, leaves people spiritually ill and unable to gain traction in addressing the roots of their illness. These are complex healing requirements, and if we are to reach a new level of consciousness, we must turn to as many sources as possible to address all the problems that arise in the modern environment. So far we have been discussing the relative merits of these two ancient wisdom systems in offering a path to meaning and a path to healing in general terms. The intention was to provide a context for understanding just one of the ways the two systems come together to create a path to greater self-awareness in the practice of Deep Hypnosis. There are many Deep Hypnosis techniques that emerge from the intersection of shamanism and Buddhism, but here I will focus on how altered states of consciousness are accessed to expand consciousness: The Journey.

The journey is an altered state process that combines the shamanic journey method of practice with the intent of the Buddhist practice of Vipassana meditation.

Meditation and shamanic travel are processes that take place in the altered state. The altered state helps seekers to connect with their inner experience in a broader way. We spend most of our time in the vigilant and decisive state of consciousness of the conscious mind. In Buddhism, the goal of working with the altered state is similar to the goal of working with the altered state in shamanism: to go beyond the confines of the conscious mind and therefore receive information or knowledge to those who do not. it can be accessed by working with the conscious mind. only. We are so used to working within the limits of the conscious mind that we forget that there are other states of consciousness that we can access. This is true even though we all access other states of consciousness every night while dreaming. Shamanic travel and meditation offer access points to some of these other states of consciousness. They both shift consciousness inward. Both, when practiced regularly, naturally open the perceptual ability to discern inner experience. The method they use to open the doors to inner experience is different. Shamanic travel uses sound as a vehicle to shift awareness inward, and meditation uses a single point of focus, usually observation of the breath, to focus attention inward. The importance of rediscovering these inward pathways and working in the altered state is critical to solving problems such as loss of compass, loss of meaning, and loss of access to healing faced by modern people. This is because, as Albert Einstein pointed out, problems cannot always be solved at the level at which they arise. Deep hypnosis is different from all other forms of hypnotherapy due to this emphasis on working on a spiritual or energetic level in an empirical way. Within this model, it is understood that all imbalance begins at the spirit level and all imbalance is resolved at the spirit level. Spirit, as defined here, is not limited to a particular religious or orthodox definition of what spirit or spirituality is. Rather, Deep Hypnosis has many processes that help a person discover the ineffable within them, which is central to personally defined forms of spiritual inquiry. Much of this research takes place in the altered state. An altered state of consciousness differs from the ordinary waking and problem-solving state that we are more used to. While this state of vigilance allows us to navigate the complexities of the consensus reality that we all share and helps us understand our place in the world, it has certain limitations. The conscious mind is designed to help us eliminate aspects of our experience that could interrupt the way we organize reality. The conscious mind filters out anything that interrupts the way we try to structure reality.

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https://www.sacredstream.org/the-journey-buddhism-and-shamanism-at-the-crossroads/

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Reference:

https://religionesenelmundo.com/creencias/indigenas/chamanismo/#Principios_conceptos_y_ensenanzas_del_Chamanismo

http://www.diosuniversal.com/Leyendas/Chamanismo

https://masdemx.com/2016/01/los-chamanes-mas-poderosos-de-mexico-intima-seleccion-de-jacobo-grinberg-zylberbaum/

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